Hyde Park London | Winners

FIRST PRIZE

HPL8394N: Seounghyun Cheon, Jihyeon Min (South Korea)

 

The proposal appears at first to be a conventional architectural response to the brief and its parkland setting. However, within its orthodox exterior, the building creates a ‘hidden world’; a new park with an apparently infinite horizon and endless bookshelves. Like the experience generated reading a novel, a new “boundless” world is unveiled by the imagination that is not limited by physical size or location.

-Terry Pawson

 

An inspirational concept, learning outdoors amongst the trees. The 10m high Atrium space has a glass ceiling to let in light, and retains existing trees – which would need pruning if they got close to the roof! Grass is shown on the floor surface, in practice this would be difficult to maintain once trafficked, however the overall feel of the design intent is light-filled and natural.

-Adrian Welch

SECOND PRIZE

HPL8940T: Agata Balikowska (Poland)

 

The proposal makes a clear and rational separation between finding, storing information and the act of reading. The way that the park flows through the site with the grid of park benches, creates an interesting relationship with the random disposition of the trees and the soft curves of the glass enclosures. The strict imposition of the grid interestingly has nothing to do with the underlying physical structure of the building, but seems to give an unusually strict spatial structure to the act of reading within the informality of the park.

-Terry Pawson

 

An elegant series of curvilinear glassy pavilions, surely inspired by Toyo Ito and SANAA. The parkland forms have a good relationship with the water and each other. By day, depending on glass types, they will be much less transparent, though the choice of a night-time images is beguiling. Much of the programme is below ground in a more rational, efficient envelope.

-Adrian Welch

THIRD PRIZE

HPL64244: Miriana Kostova, Bernd Bartoz Jan Wroblewski, Daniel Lechler (Germany)

 

Rather than imagining the library as a single place, this design proposes a series of discreet locations where the individual (or small group) is hidden from the outside world within a private physical space created by the externally mirrored boxes. This architectural concept makes an analogous reference to how an individual relates directly and in a very private way with the contents of a book rather than its external physical presence.

-Terry Pawson

 

A delightful, subtle response that doesn’t provide a building per se but a series of smaller points of learning threaded between the trees. In practice this proposal would need robust detailing to counter vandalism. The project works around the context rather than imposing upon it.

-Adrian Welch